Don't Blame Child who are Bad. Blame those who failed to Discipline

Ralph Waldo Emerson once observed, "Our chief want in life is somebody who will make us do what we can." Although children doubtless do not recognize it at the time, they crave discipline, particularly during their formative years.

Discipline defines boundaries for them, provides security, and is an active expression of a parent's love. Most important, it prepares them for the challenges of adulthood. If your childhood was less than perfect, you are in good company. Most of us have experienced difficulties at one time or another, and we all make mistakes from time to time.

The good news is that while your environment as a child will have a profound influence upon the person you become, it is not the sole determinant. The person you choose to be is entirely up to you. Only you can decide who and what you will become in life.

Making Life Easy for a Child usually makes it Hard for them in Adult

Del Smith, the millionaire founder and chairman of Evergreen International Aviation, has often said, "Thank God I was born poor; I learned how to work." Like many others who made it to the top on their own, Smith believes that the greatest gift that can be given to a child is to teach him or her the value of work. It is a gift that can never be lost or stolen.

It's a natural desire of parents to give their children material things they didn't have as children. Such generosity, however, often deprives children of the greatest gift you can give them: confidence in their ability to take care of themselves. When you make life "hard" for your children by requiring them to learn the value of work, they will have a far greater likelihood of success as adults.

I Wish You Enough

Recently I overheard a father and daughter in their last moments together at the airport. The airline had announced her departure and standing near the security gate, they hugged and he said, "I love you. I wish you enough."

Wooden Bowl

A frail old man went to live with his son, daughter-in-law and four-year grandson. The old man's hands trembled, his eyesight was blurred and his steps faltered.

The family ate together at the table. But the elderly grandfather's shaky hands and failing sight made eating difficult. Peas rolled off his spoon onto the floor. When he grasped the glass, milk spilled on the tablecloth.

Family

I ran into a stranger as he passed by, "Oh excuse me please" was my reply.

He said, "Please excuse me, too; I wasn't really watching for you." We were very polite, this stranger and I. We went on our way and we said good-bye.

But at home a different story is told, how we treat our loved ones, young and old.